FAQs – session 1

I’m opening up my brain to you guys!
Do you have a burning question about food, diet or nutrition that you’ve always wanted to know the answer to?
No matter how random, get in touch via email, twitter or facebook and I’ll do my best to answer in my new series of FAQs.

Due to my hectic work schedule, I sometimes eat really late at night, is this bad?
Research shows that it’s not the time at which you eat the calories, but the total amount of calories consumed throughout the day that matters.

It’s not like by eating just before you go to bed you’ll immediately store those calories all as fat because…(prepare yourself! Shock…horror…!)…you still burn calories when you sleep! I know, it’s great! If you think about it, it makes total sense. You still need your heart, your lungs and even your brain to work when you’re sleeping, right? All of these processes require energy.

The one downside of eating just before going to bed might be that some people get an upset stomach from going into a horizontal position so soon after eating, but in terms of weight gain, the balance of what you eat through the day is much more important.

Are carbs fattening?
I have lost count of how many times I have been asked this question.

First of all, scientifically speaking, the term ‘carbs’ or ‘carbohydrates’ doesn’t just apply to starches, it applies to all ‘sugars’, so this includes the sugars found in dairy products, fruits, vegetables and chocolate. Fibre is also a type of carbohydrate. However, when people ask me this question, most of them are referring specifically to starchy carbs such as bread, pasta, potatoes and rice.

Starchy carbs are an important source of energy, vitamins, minerals and fibre – (fibre is important in disease prevention and some types have been shown to reduce cholesterol levels, see my post on fibre for more details).Per gram, ‘carbs’ contain the same number of calories as protein, so no, they on their own are not fattening. Carbs have got their bad reputation because people often eat much more than they need, and because we tend to add fats to them. A large number of processed products are also carbohydrate based, and these often have fats added to them to enhance their flavour. Rice, pasta, potatoes, bread or cereals in sensible portions are healthy foods to include in your diet (select brown/wholewheat options to up your fibre intake).

I’ve heard that I shouldn’t eat fruit after a meal, is this true?
The short answer here is…..NO!

People have asked me this stating that they have read that eating fruit straight after a meal interferes with the digestion of food eaten.  Well I’m not quite sure where this comes from, but the truth is fruit may actually HELP with the absorption of some nutrients after a meal. As mentioned in my vitamin C post, fruits containing vitamin C may help absorb iron from foods, especially non-meat sources. Rich in nutrients, fruit is a completely healthy thing to have as a dessert, it’s lower in calories than apple pie and custard, and if it helps curb your sweet tooth, it’s definitely a better option than a handful of biscuits!

Remember though that it’s everything in moderation, fruit (like any other food) contains calories and too much of a good thing can be not such a good thing! See my post on portion sizes for more info.

Do I need to go gluten free to lose weight?
No. Unfortunately, the media has a big impact on what diet is perceived as ‘healthy’. Gluten free does not automatically mean less calories, sometimes it can even mean more…as well as more added sugar…!

Some people have a true intolerance to gluten and have to cut it out from their diet. Given that gluten free produce is (generally) more expensive, harder to get hold of, there is less choice available, I tend to advise people not to go gluten free unless they need to. That said, of course, health is about the bigger picture, so yes, it is possible to lose weight and be healthier by going gluten free, but do you need to do it? Certainly not.

How many eggs should I have in a week?
People are often concerned about the egg and cholesterol debate. Eggs are a great source of nutrients, quick to cook and easy to make a meal from. Egg yolks do contain cholesterol, in fact 1 egg contains around 55% of your daily recommended amount. However, it is not as simple as eating more cholesterol = higher cholesterol levels*. It has been found that saturated fats (fats that are solid at room temperature, mostly from animal sources) have a bigger impact on your total cholesterol level than cholesterol contained in foods.

There is currently no recommendation in place regarding a maximum number of eggs per week, but bear in mind that we should try and eat a variety of foods – so don’t rely on eggs as your sole source of protein.

*For people with familial hypercholesterolemia (a hereditary condition causing high-cholesterol), there is a recommended limit on eggs and other foods that contain cholesterol. For more information, download this comprehensive leaflet from the British Heart Foundation.

Advertisements

Overnight Oats

20150624_081620

Rushed in the morning; no time to make breakfast?
Want something quick, convenient and tasty that will keep you going till lunch?
Enjoy porridge in the winter but not so keen on hot breakfasts through the summer?

It’s your lucky day!

This recipe can be prepared the night before, saving you loads of time in the morning! It’s healthy, tasty and can be varied by adding different toppings so you don’t get bored.

INGREDIENTS
Porridge oats (40g) (use gluten free oats if necessary)
Milk (120-150ml) (The nutritional values below are for semi-skimmed cow’s milk, but you could also use soy, almond or any other milk!)

METHOD
1. Put the oats into a bowl (or a sealable jar if you have one!)
2. Pour over the milk.
3. Cover with cling film or close the lid, and leave the oats in your fridge overnight.
4. The following morning, choose the toppings of your choice and enjoy. (You can also pop the bowl in the microwave for a minute if you prefer it warm.)

NUTRITIONAL INFO:
Calories
: 220kcal
Carbs: 33g
Protein: 11g
Fat: 5g
Saturated fats: 2g

20140730_083037 (2)Topping ideas:
– Banana (or just about any other fruit!)
– Frozen berries
– Chopped apricots
– Yoghurt
– Chopped nuts
– Seeds
– Honey
– Peanut butter

Nutrient Nugget – Iron

Why do we need iron?

Iron plays an important role in several essential bodily functions. It’s a crucial ingredient for haemoglobin, the substance found in red blood cells that carries oxygen around the body. Without oxygen, our organs and cells would not be able to respire; a process that keeps us alive! Although transport of oxygen is a principle function of iron, it is also a component of enzymes and helps with energy production.

IronWhere do we get it from?

There are two types of iron; haem and non-haem. Haem sources of iron are found in meat and fish, and are more easily absorbed by the body than non-haem sources. For this reason, vegans and vegetarians should take extra care to include plenty of iron rich foods in their diet. See my post on ‘how to be a healthy veggie‘ for more information.

Foods containing high levels of iron include; meat (especially offal), fish, eggs, dark green vegetables (spinach, swiss chard, kale, bok choy), lentils, beans (kidney, black, chic peas), wholegrains, nuts and dried fruit.

Some foods, such as soy bean products (milk, yoghurts and tofu), breakfast cereals and flour are fortified with iron. These can be a handy source, especially for fussy eaters, so check the labels of your favourites!

A handy hint: Vitamin C can help our body absorb more iron. So by having a source of vitamin C alongside your meal, you’ll get the most iron you can from it. Good sources of vitamin C include; citrus fruits, peppers, broccoli and sweet potato.

You should also avoid having tea and coffee at the same time as meals, as they contain phytates which bind with the iron and make it more difficult for the body to absorb.

How much do we need?

Iron reference nutrient intake gradually increases throughout childhood. The recommended daily intake for the adult population is 8.7mg for men and 14.8mg for women. Women have a higher requirement to allow for losses during menstruation (Department of Health, 1991).

Below shows the amount of iron contained in 50g of;

Liver* = 5mg

Lentils = 1.5mg

Dried apricots = 2mg

Broccoli = 0.5mg

Breakfast cereals (30g portion) = 4mg (depends on cereal)

An average steak will provide about 7mg of iron

*Liver is not recommended during pregnancy due to its high vitamin A content.

What if we don’t get enough?

Iron deficiency anemia or IDA is one of the most common nutritional deficiencies in the world. It occurs when a lack of iron in the body results in a low number of red blood cells. IDA can result in the following symptoms; fatigue, breathlessness, insomnia, loss of appetite, decreased immunity, heart palpitations and a tingling sensation in your fingers and toes (paraesthesia).

IDA is usually easily treated by taking a iron supplement which boosts the levels of iron in your body. Recurrence can then be prevented by ensuring a diet rich in good sources of iron. Some women who regularly have heavy periods may need to take an iron supplement, ask your doctor for more advice.

What if we get too much?

Too much iron usually occurs through use of a supplement but can lead to constipation, nausea, vomiting, and stomach pain. Intakes of less than 20mg are unlikely to cause any problems, but very high doses can be fatal, so be sure to keep iron supplements out of reach of children.

Where can I find out more?

NHS Choices – Iron deficiency anaemia

NHS Choices – Iron

Department of Health (1991). Dietary reference values for food energy and nutrients for the United Kingdom.